Building Information Modeling (BIM)

What is BIM?
Building information modeling (BIM) is a process involving the generation and management of digital representations of physical and functional characteristics of places. Building information models (BIMs) are files (often but not always in proprietary formats and containing proprietary data) which can be exchanged or networked to support decision-making about a place. Current BIM software is used by individuals, businesses and government agencies who plan, design, construct, operate and maintain diverse physical infrastructures, such as water, wastewater, electricity, gas, refuse and communication utilities, roads, bridges and ports, houses, apartments, schools and shops, offices, factories, warehouses and prisons.
BIM is a relatively new technology in an industry typically slow to adopt change. Yet many early adopters are confident that BIM will grow to play an even more crucial role in building documentation.
It is simply the means by which everyone can understand a building through the use of a digital model. Modelling an asset in digital form enables those who interact with the building to optimise their actions, resulting in a greater whole life value for the asset.
Through BIM the UK construction industry is undergoing its very own digital revolution. BIM is a way of working; it is information modelling and information management in a team environment, all team members should be working to the same standards as one another. BIM creates value from the combined efforts of people, process and technology

Singapore
The Building and Construction Authority (BCA) has announced that BIM would be introduced for architectural submission (by 2013), structural and M&E submissions (by 2014) and eventually for plan submissions of all projects with gross floor area of more than 5,000 square metres by 2015.

How can BIM help you?
BIM brings together all of the information about every component of a building, in one place. It makes it possible for anyone to access that information for any purpose, e.g. to integrate different aspects of the design more effectively. In this way, the risk of mistakes or discrepancies is reduced, and abortive costs minimized.
BIM data can be used to illustrate the entire building life-cycle, from cradle to cradle, from inception and design to demolition and materials reuse. Spaces, systems, products and sequences can be shown in relative scale to each other and, in turn, relative to the entire project. And by signalling conflict detection BIM prevents errors creeping in at the various stages of development/construction.
Proponents claim that BIM offers:
1. Improved visualization
2. Improved productivity due to easy retrieval of information
3. Increased coordination of construction documents
4. Embedding and linking of vital information such as vendors for specific materials, location of details and quantities required for estimation and tendering
5. Increased speed of delivery
6. Reduced costs

What is a BIM object?
A BIM object is a combination of many things:
* Information content that defines a product
* Product properties, such as thermal performance
* Geometry representing the product’s physical characteristics
* Visualisation data giving the object a recognisable appearance
* Functional data, such as detection zones, that enables the object to be positioned and behave in the same manner as the product itself.

International BIM developments(Is highly demand around the globe)

Singapore
Hong Kong
India
Iran
South Korea
Czech Republic
France
Lithuania
Norway
Switzerland
The Netherlands.
United Kingdom
Canada
United States of America
Nigeria
New Zealand

BIM Software
Due to the complexity of gathering all the relevant information when working with BIM on a building project some companies have developed software designed specifically to work in a BIM framework. These packages (e.g.: Bentley AECOsim Building Designer], ArchiCAD, Tekla Structures, Autodesk AutoCad, Autodesk Revit, VectorWorks and ARCHIBUS EIM with BIM 4.0. Others: Autodesk 3D Studio Max, Solidworks, etc) differ from architectural drafting tools such as AutoCAD by allowing the addition of further information (time, cost, manufacturers’ details, sustainability and maintenance information, etc.) to the building model.

The future of BIM
The future of the construction industry is digital, and BIM is the future of design and long term facility management; it is government led and driven by technology and clear processes; and it is implementing change across all industries. As hardware, software and cloud applications herald greater capability to handle increasing amounts of raw data and information, use of BIM will become even more pronounced than it is in current projects.
The UK Government’s Construction 2025: Industrial Strategy for Construction is targeting lower costs, faster delivery, lower emissions and improvements in exports to position the UK at the forefront of international construction. The UK Government’s Construction Strategy 2011 is a framework for a range of work streams, all of which contribute to the 2025 strategy. This framework forms the basis of the government’s BIM hypothesis:
Government as a client can derive significant improvements in cost, value and carbon performance through the use of open sharable asset information.
The objective of the Construction Strategy 2011 is to accelerate the adoption of BIM throughout the UK construction supply chain. The requirements by 2016 are for all centrally procured Government projects to be a fully collaborative 3D BIM (with all project and asset information, documentation and data being digital).

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